Images 1 March – 18 April

1 Imitatio et Emulatio, 2014
exhibition view
2 Horowitz plays op. 15 (Fast zu Ernst), 2014
ink and pencil on paper, framed, 43 x 37 x 3 cm
clay, wood, 28 x 12 x 14 cm
3 Ashkenazy plays Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826
installation view
4 Ashkenazy plays Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826
installation view
5 Ashkenazy plays Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826
installation view
6 1. Sinfonia (grave – adagio – andante), 2014
wax, plaster, 16 x 20 x 13 cm
7 2. Allemande, 2014
wax, plaster, cement, 24 x 14 x 14 cm
8 3. Courante, 2014
wax plaster, cement, 17 x 16 x 9 cm
9 4. Sarabande, 2014
wax, plaster, cement, 24 x 16 x 9 cm
10 5. Rondeaux, 2014
wax, plaster, cement, 28 x 15 x 13 cm
11 6. Capriccio, 2014
wax, plaster, 25 x 19 x 12 cm
12 Michelangeli plays Children’s Corner L 117
installation view
13 Michelangeli plays Children’s Corner L 117
installation view
14 Michelangeli plays Children’s Corner L 117
installation view
15 1. Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum, 2014
Cement, 19 x 15.5 x 8 cm
16 2. Jimbo’s Lullaby, 2014
cement, 19 x 20 x 11 cm
17 3. Serenade for the Doll, 2014
cement, 29 x 14 x 10 cm
18 4. The Snow is Dancing, 2014
cement, 16 x 13 x 8 cm
19 5. The Little Shepherd, 2014
cement, 21 x 14 x 12 cm
20 6. Golliwog’s Cakewalk, 2014
cement, 23 x 15 x 11 cm
21 Imitatio et Emulatio, 2014
exhibition view
22 Imitatio et Emulatio, 2014
exhibition view
23 Imitatio et Emulatio, 2014
exhibition view
24 Imitatio et Emulatio, 2014
exhibition view
25 Barenboim plays
installation view
26 Barenboim plays
installation view
27 Barenboim plays
installation view
28 Barenboim plays
installation view
29 Barenboim plays
installation view
30 1. G major Op. 37, 2014
Plaster, MDF, metal, 37 x 30 x 30 cm
31 2. C minor; F sharp major Op. 48, 2014
Plaster, MDF, metal, 32 x 30 x 30 cm
32 3. F minor; E flat major Op. 55, 2014
Plaster, MDF, metal, 36 x 30 x 30 cm
33 4. B major; E major Op. 62, 2014
Plaster, MDF, metal, 32 x 30 x 30 cm
34 5. C minor Op. post., 2014
Plaster, MDF, metal, 30 x 30 x 30 cm

Press Release

Dan Gunn is pleased to announce the opening of the second exhibition by Alessio delli Castelli at the gallery.

The cultural vantage point of being a European is that a properly pointed backward gaze allows one to draw uninterrupted historical lines that connect the present far back to the Palaeolithic. By association, these are lines which can be drawn from any given moment in time backwards and forwards. Museum exhibits are resting points from which these lines can be drawn. They objectify those aspects of human culture which change while remaining fundamentally the same. In the same way as objects in museums present themselves, these lines are never wholesome and continuous but fragmentary and jagged.

Imitatio et emulatio is a Neoclassical formula that signals a distinction between sterile copying and a subtle operation, which through working within the boundaries of an image, extends its possibilities. In this sense copies from antiquity can be said to have a connection to classical music performance. To a lesser degree, the same prejudice towards the invention of new forms exists in music as well. A composer is considered more important than a performer, although there is a relationship of interdependence between them. This may not be so acute between visual artists from different eras, but it exists nonetheless. There is, both for music and the visual arts, the problem of retrieving forms from the past and allowing them to have existence in a present.

Since its inception, photography has been received with mixed emotion by the visual arts. Many of the artists that lived during its early development warned about its dangers for perception. We live at a time when photography is considered the most accurate form of representation of a work of art. Photography presents objects through a fundamental formal lie, especially when it comes to three-dimensional objects. There is an unbridgeable distance between the object and its photograph which can only be crossed by having contact with the original object. That is, however, further and further away from the realm of our possibilities.

Images

1 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
2 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
3 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
4 Untitled, 2013
Wood and varnish
140.5 x 26.5 x 39.5 cm
5 Untitled, 2013
Plaster, metal and gloss paint
36 x 35.5 x 5 cm
6 Untitled, 2013
Plaster, metal and gloss paint
20 x 19 x 3.5 cm
7 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
9 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
8 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
10 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
11 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
12 Untitled, 2013
Wood and gloss paint
144 x 26.5 x 33.5 cm
13 Untitled, 2013
Wood and undercoat paint
162.5 x 14.5 x 33 cm
14 Untitled, 2013
Plaster, metal and gloss paint
25.5 x 23.5 x 4.5 cm
15 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
16 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
17 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
18 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
19 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
20 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
21 Restaurant, 2013
exhibition view
22 Untitled, 2013
Wood and oil-based paint
150 x 25.5 x 41.5 cm
23 Untitled, 2013
Wood and floor paint
137 x 22 x 26 cm
24 Untitled, 2013
Wood and gloss paint
185.5 x 13.5 x 34.5 cm
25 Untitled, 2013
Wood and oil-based paint
161.5 x 14.5 x 33.5 cm

Images

1 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
2 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
3 The Black Paintings: Dead White Man, 2012
single colour projection with stereo audio speakers, 12'9" loop
4 The Black Paintings: Dead White Man, 2012
single colour projection with stereo audio speakers, 12'9" loop
5 The Black Paintings: Dead White Man, 2012
single colour projection with stereo audio speakers, 12'9" loop
6 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
7 Portrait of a Young Black Man, 2013 (in collaboration with L1)
mixed mediums on paper, 240 x 210 cm
8 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
9 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
10 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
11 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
12 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
13 Elephant Family, 2013 (working progress)
mixed mediums on paper, 74.5 x 150 cm
14 Lala, 2013
mixed mediums on paper, 228 x 150 cm
15 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
17 A Muster of Peacocks: THE SHOAH, 2012
single colour video played on iPad with stereo audio speaker, 10' 43"
16 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
18 A Muster of Peacocks: THE SHOAH, 2012
single colour video played on iPad with stereo audio speaker, 10' 43"
19 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
20 Super Aero, 2013 (working title)
mixed mediums on paper, 162 x 101.5 cm
21 Super Sometimes: Life In The Underground, 2012
pencil and felt pen on paper, 7 parts, each 10.5 x 14.7 cm
22 Super Sometimes: Life In The Underground, 2012
detail of work
23 Super Sometimes: Life In The Underground, 2012
detail of work
24 Super Sometimes: Life In The Underground, 2012
detail of work
25 Super Sometimes: Life In The Underground, 2012
detail of work
26 Super Sometimes: Life In The Underground, 2012
detail of work
27 Super Sometimes: Life In The Underground, 2012
detail of work
28 Super Sometimes: Life In The Underground, 2012
detail of work
29 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view
30 The Black Paintings, 2013
exhibition view

News

Alexandra Navratil
All That Slides, Strikes, Rises and Falls
solo booth at Frieze New York, booth B22, Frame section

13 – 17 May

Tracey Rose
in Body Talk, curated by Koyo Kouoh
Lunds Konsthall, Lund

30 May – 27 September

Musa paradisiaca
Ecstasy and Eden
solo booth at LISTE Basel, booth 1/1/2

15 – 21 June

Michael Smith
Excuse me!?!…I’m looking for the “Fountain of Youth”
solo exhibition at Greene Naftali, New York

25 June – 14 August

Tracey Rose
in Homosexuality_ies, curated by Birgit Bosold, Dorothée Brill and Detlef Weitz
Schwules Museum, Berlin

26 June – 01 December

The Brancusi Effect – An Archival Impulse
With texts by Alessio delli Castelli
published by Kunsthalle Wien and Dan Gunn

Adrià Julià
in SPECIES OF SPACES, curated by Frederic Montornés
MACBA, Barcelona
accompanied by a publication, SOLID SLAB, published by MACBA and Dan Gunn

16 July – 31 January 2016

Tracey Rose
in Álbum de Família, curated by Adriana Salomão
Centro Cultural Helio Oiticia, Rio de Janeiro

01 August – 19 September

Alexandra Navratil
in Shadow Scenes, curated by Natasha Ginwala
Colomboscope, Colombo

21 – 30 August

Tracey Rose
in SGUARDO DI DONNA / Through Womens’ Eyes, curated by Francesca Alfano Miglietti
Casa dei Tre Oci, Venice

11 September – 08 December

Tracey Rose
Lassoing with the Post-Colonial Pirates
solo exhibition at Dan Gunn

12 September – 07 November

Musa paradisiaca
performance programme at Museu Serralves, Porto

19 & 20 September

Tracey Rose
in The San Juanita: Re-examining Borders, curated by Jesus Macarena-Avila
Haitian American Museum of Chicago

01 October – 14 November

Adrià Julià, Alexandra Navratil, Musa paradisiaca & Tracey Rose
group presentation at Frieze London, Focus section, booth G23

13 – 17 October

Musa paradisiaca
solo exhibition at CRAC Alsace, Altkirch

opening Sunday, 18 October

Tracey Rose
in Body Talk, curated by Koyo Kouoh
FRAC Lorraine, Metz

30 October – 17 January 2016

List of works

THINGE

An exhibition of artworks that use everyday thinges as readymades, assembled or taken apart, copied or alluded to, put together by João Penalva.

Ingrid Furre, Joseph Grigely, Kentaro Hiroki, Narelle Jubelin, Ian Kiaer, R. Rom, Antonina Sofronova, James Welling and Richard Wentworth

07 June – 03 August, 2013

 

First room

 

Ian Klaer
Ulchiro project: Inflatable, 2013
plastic, polystyrene, paper, fan
model: 10.5 x 52 x 52 cm
inflatable: 220 x 260 x 250 cm
poster: 194 x 130 cm

The Ulchiro project, started in 2008, takes its name from a district in Seoul where a building materials market is being displaced, making way for an artificial river running through the city. Kiaer’s works of fragmentary, utopian models, industrial remnants, architectural structures, inflatables and posters are, in his own words, “contingent, flexible gestures”.

 

Narelle Jubelin
Transitional objects, uncommon parts, 2013
embossed plastic wall text.
three prototype, white lacquered steel L-beam shelves, designed by Marcos Corrales Lantero in 2004, Madrid. Produced by Ediciones Despacio SL, Madrid.
10 x 30 x 45 cm

Jubelin’s work often takes the form of displays of found, purchased or gifted items — artefacts, common and unique objects — and her own petit point renditions of images from the most various sources. The understanding of the relationships between these disparate items often relies on descriptive labeling that, while resembling museological attribution, combines her historical, geo-political research into the displayed objects with biographical anecdote and coincidence.

Shelf 1:
Pure cotton saree cloth, purchased in 2012 from Haniffa Emporium Pte. Ltd., (Est. in 1962), Little India, Singapore. Marked ‘Product of India’;
approximately 31 x 38 x 3 cm (folded)
eight broken Lalique Cabochon Gourmande crystal rings, designed by René Lalique in 1931. One received as a gift on the birth of my son in 2001, in Madrid, accidentally broken by him in 2003, and pieces from Cabochon rings purchased since. Lalique offers an exchange guarantee of a half price new ring if the original is broken within a year of purchase;
various dimensions
black ridged, flat-ended trade bead, purchased in 2003 from Egyptian Spice Bazaar, Istanbul, (built in 1664). Identified as ‘Kenyan’;
approximately 4.7 x 1.5 cm
three flat-ended brown trade beads purchased in 2013 from New Caledonian Market (founded in 1855), London, also known as Bermondsey Antiques Market. Beads described as ‘Old tribal components large Africa’, and ‘possibly Antique Cranberry Glass’.
approximately 2.6 x 2 cm, 2.6 x 1.5 cm, 2.7 x 1.5 cm

Shelf 2:
Silk saree cloth with metallic thread, purchased duty free in 1990, in British Hong Kong, from International Freight and Passenger Terminal, Hong Kong Kai Tak Airport (1924-1998). Labeled ‘Product of India’;
approximately 24 x 40 x 4 cm (folded)
two 1959 Australian pound one shilling silver coins, purchased by weight in 2013, with added hanging rings to be worn as jewelry, from Quilates, Pasaje Comercial Carretas, Madrid. Coins bear Elizabeth II on the obverse and Merino sheep and the Comonwealth Star on the reverse;
2.35 cm diameter
six bronze Wang Mang Chinese coins (c. 23AD) received as a gift from a friend in 2013, in London, with added cotton petit point on silk gauze renditions of grains of rice, sewed in Madrid, 2013;
appx. 2.5mm diameter
two found brass, currently circulating Spanish 10 euro cent coins, with added lead ring to match the weight of the 2 euro coin, received as a gift in 2012 from Bar Candela, Lavapiés, Madrid. Used fraudulently in cigarette vending machines and parking meters.
approximately 20.32mm diameter

Shelf 3:
Pure cotton saree cloth with plaid and seed pattern, purchased in 2001 from Haniffa Emporium Pte. Ltd., (Est. in 1962), Little India, Singapore, labeled ‘Made in India’.
33.5 x 36.5 x 4 cm (folded)
shell from ostrich egg received as a gift from my son in 2013, purchased from Chamartin Food Market, in Madrid, (Est. in 1962). Misdescribed by him as ‘a Cassowary egg’, accidentally broken three days after receiving it.
various dimensions
replacement ostrich egg purchased in 2013 from the same market vendor who described it as “European”; appoximately 21 cm x 42 cm diameter
black caraway seeds purchased in 2013 from Friday Morning Turkish Market, in Kreuzberg, Berlin, (started from the 1970s). The source of the seeds is believed to be Gujarat, in India.

 

Kentaro Hiroki
FedEx work 8020 9254 3631, 2013
pencil on paper, paper clip
23.5 x 24 cm

From 1998 to the present Kentaro Hiroki has methodically copied receipts, tickets and other ephemeral documents of his daily travel and shopping. Since 2007 he has also copied discarded paper items found during the course of both.

 

Second room

 

Kentaro Hiroki
Rubbish works, 2012
Camel cigarettes, Hung To Road, Hong Kong, 2012
Bombay sweet, Hung To Road, Hong Kong, 2012
Lay snack, On nut Road, Bangkok, 2012
Thai-Danish milk, Thian Thale 25, Bangkok, 2012
pencil on paper

 

Richard Wentworth
Measure, measure (for Bigas Luna), 2013
assorted timbers, steel, glass and foodstuffs
dimensions variable

In the past, Wentworth has commented on “Berlin’s scale and calibration”, having lived in the city from 1993 to ’95. In his words, Measure, measure is a response not just to Berlin’s characteristics but also a gentle memorial to his friend from the 1970s, who first introduced him to the ‘exotic’ and ideas of extemporisation and resourcefulness in Barcelona in the years before the death of Franco.

 

James Welling
Untitled #9 (New Abstraction), 1998
silver gelatine print
89 x 67 cm
edition of 3

The series New Abstractions 1998-2008 began as 20.3 x 25.4cm photograms of superimposed, discarded strips of heavy Bristol board paper. The final gelatin silver prints were printed from highly contrasted negatives produced by digitally scanning the original photograms.

 

James Welling
Q-002
(Quadralaterals 2006), 2006
inkjet print
106.7 x 88.8 cm
edition of 5

The images in the Quadrilaterals series, 2005, are based on a series of 50.8 x 60.9cm black and white Polaroid images of four-sided shapes, manipulated though the Maya and Photoshop computer programs. In recreating the work in Maya, Welling produced facsimile images of the Polaroid images in vector space.

 

Third room

 

Antonina Sofronova
ink on paper
23.3 x 19.7cm

In her Constructivist period, Antonina Sofranova made an unknown number of variations on a form that can be interpreted as a teapot viewed from the side, top, or bottom. Although this resemblance has not been addressed by her scholars and nothing in her biography confirms it, the shapes of a spout and a handle can be seen in all the variations.

 

Ingrid Furre
Rest 74, 2013
wood, foam, felt, acrylic paint
36 x 162.5 x 21 cm

Ingrid Furre describes the beginning of the series she titled Rest, the Norwegian word for ‘remnant’, as the finding of tiny pieces of Lego and parts of assembled plastic toys while sweeping the floor of an empty apartment that she was moving in to. The room, she guessed, would have been a small boy’s.

Ingrid Furre
Rest 2-73, 2013
cast soap (lye, fat, pigment, scent)
72 pieces, from 4 x 4 cm to 15 x 20 cm

Ingrid Furre
Rest 75, 2013
wood, cotton, foam, lacquer
21 x 119.5 x 41.5 cm

Ingrid Furre
Rest 76, 2013
wood, found carpet, acrylic paint
23 x 143 x 55 cm

 

Joseph Grigely
Ten Untitled Conversations, 2004
Ink and pencil on paper, pins
35.5 x 49.9cm

Joseph Grigely has said of himself that for the past 46 years he has been “deaf as a doorpost”. Much of his work up to the mid-2000s was made from all sorts of papers collected from his interlocutors in impromptu written exchanges to which he responded verbally. These were then configured as “narrative grids”, grouped by subject, colour, or as “deliberate polychromes”.

 

R. Rom
Undated albumen print, blind-stamped R. Rom on bottom right.
13 x 8.3 cm

Unknown personal details

Images

1 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
2 Ian Kiaer
Ulchiro Project: Inflatable, 2013
plastic, polystyrene, paper, fan
3 Ian Kiaer
Ulchiro Project: Inflatable, 2013
plastic, polystyrene, paper, fan
4 Ian Kiaer
Ulchiro Project: Inflatable, 2013
plastic, polystyrene, paper, fan
5 Narelle Jubelin
Transitional objects, uncommon parts, 2013
embossed plastic wall text, white lacquered shelves, mixed media
6 Narelle Jubelin
Transitional objects, uncommon parts, 2013
embossed plastic wall text, white lacquered shelves, mixed media
7 Narelle Jubelin
Transitional objects, uncommon parts, 2013
embossed plastic wall text, white lacquered shelves, mixed media
8 Narelle Jubelin
Transitional objects, uncommon parts, 2013
embossed plastic wall text, white lacquered shelves, mixed media
9 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
10 Kentaro Hiroki
Fedex work 8020 9254 3631, 2013
pencil on paper, paper clip
11 Kentaro Hiroki
Rubbish works, 2012
12 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
13 Richard Wentworth
Measure, measure (for Bigas Luna), 2013
assorted timbers, steel, glass and foodstuffs
14 Richard Wentworth
Measure, measure (for Bigas Luna), 2013
assorted timbers, steel, glass and foodstuffs
15 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
16 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
17 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
18 James Welling
Untitled #9 (New Abstraction), 1998
silver gelatine print
19 James Welling
Quadrilaterals Q-002, 2006
inkjet print
20 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
21 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
22 Antonina Sofronova
ink on paper, undated
23 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
24 THINGE, 2013
exhibition view
25 Ingrid Furre
Rest 74, 2013
wood, foam, felt, acrylic paint
26 Ingrid Furre
Rest 2-73, 2013
cast soap (lye, fat, pigment, scent)
27 Ingrid Furre
Rest 75, 2013
wood, cotton, foam, lacquer
28 Ingrid Furre
Rest 76, 2013
wood, found carpet, acrylic paint
29 Joseph Grigely
Ten untitled Conversations, 2004
ink and pencil on paper, pins
30 R. Rom
Undated albumen print
blind-stamped R. Rom on bottom right

Press Release

Inchon, directed by Terence Young, was made from 1979 – 1981 and was released in 1982.
Haunted by propaganda, a desire for heroism and the financial, artistic and ethical compromises that bogged the production from start to finish, the legend of Inchon is one of failure. It was a monumental box-office flop, was criticised heavily on its reception in both South Korea and the US, and is today often remembered as one of the worst movies ever made. Inspired by the perceived heroism of General Douglas MacArthur’s beach landing at Inchon during the Korean War, the film was funded and produced by Reverend Sung Myung Moon, the controversial founder of the Unification Church of Korea. The script was suspected of harbouring propagandistic messages and stories soon began to emerge of linguistic and cultural misunderstanding on set, fuelled by the idiotic decision to film (as a matter of convenience) the people’s uprising in Gwangju that resulted in the Gwangju Massacre of 1980. Inchon was doomed to failure before it was even released.

In 2009, Adrià Julià made Notes on the Missing Oh, a three-channel video installation which revisited and examined the film. In order to piece together the story and context Julià visited film locations of Inchon throughout Korea, compiled media reviews and news articles, and conducted interviews with some of the film’s original cast and crew.

For this exhibition, Julià has returned to the Notes on the Missing Oh project and has produced a series of new works which continue the remaking, renovating, retooling and re-imagining which make up the reconstitution of Inchon into new forms.